Tag Archives: love

We are one body…

It seems like we are living in a divided and troubled world.

We have shared a minutes silence more often in the last 4 weeks than I remember in twenty years of being a teacher. We have witnessed the horrific Grenfell Tower fire with such tragic loss of life and continued extremism and terrorist attacks, the latest at Finsbury Park Mosque.

This is combined with a country divided by the election, the start of Brexit negotiations and a Government formed on a deal with a small group of politicians never before at the heart of the political system. I was proud to see the alternative speech written by a fellow Headteacher, John Tomsett, in the days following the election. Well worth a read – if only politicians could show brave leadership and integrity at the times it is most needed.

In all of this unease and confusion we need to strive to find Christ among us. We can see this in the goodness of human action in responding to challenge and tragedy. God is good and God is love. This is what we need to see shining through even in the darkest times.

The Feast of Corpus Christi, the Body of Christ, marks how we invite Jesus into our lives in the sacrament of the Eucharist or Communion. He is truly present in this moment. It also prompts me to consider how we can be “in communion with one another”.

So perhaps we can do a few small things this week;

  • Look to find the goodness in humanity
  • Be able to offer light and hope in some small way to others we encounter each day
  • Stop for a minute to give thanks to God for all we are blessed with – our safety, our homes, our food, our faith…

I hope and pray that we can all be part of one body, one community to enrich the gift of life that God gave us all.

God bless.

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Be the change you wish to see in the world…

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We need to “be the change we wish to see in the world”. This week after the horrific scenes in Manchester we need to have a shared commitment to live with love, compassion and forgiveness. If people look to drive us apart, accentuate our differences and conflict we have a chance to move closer together instead.

As we celebrate today the Feast of the Ascension we remember Jesus is not leaving us alone but saying, “I will always be with you” and reassuring us that the Holy Spirit, the power of God in the world, will always be with us.

In times of tragedy or suffering we need to trust in God to heal the hurt, division and distrust.

We pray today for our leaders to use love as the most powerful weapon to destroy hate and terror.

We pray for all the innocent victims of the terrorist attack in Manchester and their families. May God comfort them in their suffering and angush.

We pray for those vulnerable in society to being led towards violence and hatred in the world. May God give them strength to listen to His voice within them to do good and reject evil.

We pray that we can live our lives full of faith, hope and love.

God bless.

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I am proud to be Catholic and proud of the example of Pope Francis #thisismypope. This week he spoke these words in Mass to all of us.

“You can have defects, be anxious and live irritated sometimes, but do not forget that your life is the biggest company in the world.

Only you can prevent her from going into decline.
There are many who appreciate you, admire you and love you.

I would like you to remember that to be happy, is not to have a sky without storms, road without accidents, works without fatigue, relationships without disappointments.

To be happy is to find strength in forgiveness, hope in battles, security in the box of fear, love in disagreements.

Being happy is not only valuing the smile, but also reflecting on sadness.
It is not just to commemorate success, but to learn lessons in failures.
It is not just to have joy with applause, but to have joy in anonymity.

To be happy is to recognize that life is worth living, despite all the challenges, misunderstandings, and periods of crisis.

Being happy is not a fatality of destiny, but a conquest for those who know how to travel within their own being.

To be happy is to stop being a victim of problems and become an actor in one’s own history.
It is to cross deserts out of itself, but to be able to find an oasis in the recesses of our soul.
It is to thank God every morning for the miracle of life.

Being happy is not being afraid of your own feelings.
It is knowing how to talk about yourself.
It is courage to hear a “no”.
It is safe to receive criticism, even if it is unfair.
It is to kiss the children, to pamper parents, to have poetic moments with friends, even if they hurt us.

To be happy is to let the free, happy and simple creature live within each one of us.
It is to have maturity to say ‘I was wrong’.
It is to have the audacity to say *forgive me*.
It is to have sensitivity to express *’I need you’*.
It is to be able to say * ‘I love you’ *.

May your life become a garden of opportunity to be happy …
May you be joyous in your spring.
In your winter you are friend of wisdom.
And when you get in the way, start all over again.
Then you will be more passionate about life.
And you will discover that to be happy is not to have a perfect life.
But use tears to water the tolerance.
Use the losses to refine the patience.
Use flaws to sculpt serenity.
Use pain lapping pleasure.
Use obstacles to open the windows of intelligence.
Never give up ….
Never give up on the people you love.
Never give up being happy, because life is a must-see! “

Pope Francis

Learning to love and forgive

Forgive.pngIn one of the recent Gospel readings this week we hear of the account of how a crowd had gathered to condemn a woman accused of adultery. The crowd were demanding “instant justice” and were planning to stone her. Jesus challenged whoever was without sin to cast the first stone. Slowly one by one the crowd dispersed and the stones dropped to the ground. He gently offered his forgiveness and told her to turn away from the areas of her life that led her in the wrong direction.

This is a great message for us. Put simply we need to learn to love and forgive.

A few questions for the week ahead…

  • What can you do to use the power of forgiveness to rebuild relationships?
  • How can we stop ourselves from being too quick to judge?
  • What is it we can ask God (or others…) to forgive us of?

If we can take this small step, to drop the stone, say sorry or move on in our lives surely it can be good for us all too.

Have a happy and liberating journey this week as we prepare for the celebration of Holy Week.

God bless.

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Witness – a living faith

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We continue to hear about how Jesus seeks outs opportunities to heal those left marginalised in society. In society at the time there was a direct correlation between suffering and sin. When Jesus heals the blind man this week we can see he makes him “whole again” by healing him and challenging the suffering and prejudices he faced. Once he is healed the blind man is summoned back to bear witness to what Jesus had done ending in him being driven away by the authorities. You can feel the rising pressure and plotting for Jesus’ downfall during this time getting us ready for His entry into Jerusalem and the sacrifice of his crucifixion.

We at times can fall into a trap where we are quick to judge others and cast them aside. We can be tempted to ignore the needs of others, particularly when we are under pressure from others.

A few thoughts for this week…

  • How can you offer an unconditional love, forgiveness and support of others?
  • What do we find difficult to bear witness to in our lives?
  • How would we have responded to the blind man? Would we have walked towards him or away from him?
  • Do we have a heart for justice, peace and equality?

For me in a basic and simple way my faith is about the challenge to live it out in the everyday moments and interactions each day. We need to ask God to give us the wisdom and bravery to do the right thing, even if it is not the popular thing, even if it goes unnoticed or is un-popular.

So stand strong, stand proud and ask God to give us the bravery and confidence to bear witness in the world today.

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What are we thirsting for?

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We have all felt the feeling of being desperate for the opportunity to quench our thirst. In an attempt to live a more healthy lifestyle I do not drink (well an alcoholic drink to be more precise!) during the week. In a very basic way this has been a good discipline but I also find that I appreciate it more when I can indulge a little… 

In the theme of this week we look at the theme of thirst. In the Gospel reading we hear the account of Jesus meeting the Samaritan woman at Jacob’s Well. The story is significant on a number of levels.

  • It would be socially unacceptable for a man to speak to an unaccompanied woman at the Well.
  • The woman was a Samaritan who were the enemies of the Jewish race.
  • Jesus was directly challenging these assumptions and prejudices.
  • Jesus could see the true person and had the ability to really know the depths of her life story, warts and all.
  • This brief interaction inspired her faith and drew people to follow Jesus.

The deeper meaning of the story is actually asking us about what we really thirst and strive for. We can be satisfied in a very basic way by fulfilling our needs but the joy isn’t very long lasting unless it means something deeper.

So what may we be thirsting for?

  • I thirst for tolerance and understanding – this week we had a great opportunity to do just this by supporting Downs Syndrome Awareness where our school community, staff and students, wore odd socks to celebrate difference and simply raise awareness. Another inspiring example was Mélainie in France as she presented the weather to fulfil her dream.
  • I thirst for justice and peace – this afternoon in London it is emerging that an awful terrorist attack has taken place at the heart of our capital city. This only causes fear and division. We need to use the power of education to transform the divisions, hatred and violence we find in the world.
  • I thirst for faith – if we are truly to allow our faith to flourish we need to nourish it to the full. This takes time, energy and needs light and water.

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So let us walk together to have a shared thirst to seek out faith, hope in love in our lives and inspire this in those we meet. As a community of faith we are challenged to  become a beacon of life, light and hope. What will you do this week to live this out in a small way?

God bless.

How can we be more loving?

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A challenge in life for all of us is to think about we can be more loving in our thoughts and actions. It is so easy for all of us to get frustrated or intolerant of others when things don’t go our way. The challenge for us all in a Christian community is simply to just “love one another”.

The model for this is Jesus himself who was the physical manifestation of God’s love for us, perhaps most ably demonstrated in His sacrifice for us. In the Gospel reading at Church this week we heard it is not just about doing the wrong thing but actually about the negative thoughts or temptations we face. Of course these temptations to do wrong, or act solely in our self interest, are natural and normal but we have a choice to make about how we respond to them. Jesus challenges us to cut anything out of our lives that leads us in the wrong direction – good advice indeed as we aim to refocus on what matters most to act with loving kindness in all we do.

So on this Valentine’s day don’t be too distracted by the love hearts and helium balloons, even if there is time for a little romance, but let’s all make a commitment to simply live our lives guided by God’s unconditional love for us. It is a love that knows us simply for who we truly are and there is something wonderful about this alone.

A few questions for this week;

  • How can we act with loving kindness in all we do even if love sometimes means making difficult decisions?
  • What areas of your life would you cut out to be happier and more loving?
  • What can you do to show patience, love and understanding to each other?
  • How can you stop for a moment to appreciate God’s unconditional love for all us?

Remember all we need to do is just love one another…

God bless.

 

Advent – are you ready?

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So we are here already – in the life of the Catholic church we have already just started a new year in the 3 year liturgical cycle. We are also being challenged to get ready and be prepared.

So what are we getting ready for?

We know it is coming towards Christmas when we see the latest Christmas advert that has become a great British tradition. It can start the feeling of hope, anticipation and preparing something special for all of us and our families, a special time for all of us.

In essence this is what the Gospel is challenging us to do too… we need to be prepared and get ready. This isn’t just for one big day of indulgence or sharing presents but actually for the coming of Jesus into the world.

We are challenged to embark on a journey to get ready to welcome Jesus into our lives in a new way. It is an opportunity to get our lives in order, to pray and put things in perspective.

This in the most basic way could be the best present this Christmas, the gift of faith could last far longer than our discarded gifts or full stomachs.

I hope and pray this advent we can be blessed by renewed faith and hope in our lives and light in the world around us.

God bless.